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Music from the passing comets. Writerly notes. Scotland - America - Australia - wonders beyond Thule.

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The Ecstasy of Saint Everybody

anoellesparks:

I miss being interesting.
I don’t think you age, I think you bleed
Into the background
Which is why I wear loud thoughts and hang out in seedy parlors
Spreading my skirts and shaking loose unseemly meta-rumors
About all the martyred saints

There should be a scale of saintliness
How many cuts, arrows, heads lost
How many body parts burned for fuel
But of course suffering is the sigil, and you can’t claim
Your trophy headless,
Unless you’re heading beyond the pale or beyond
the beyond.

You remember back in the day
When everyone was having sex with ghosts?
Everyone but you, you were always miles behind the curve
All your friends were screwing Charlemagne
But you were watching vampire porn, and everybody rolled their eyes
When you said, hey, let’s have an undead orgy
And they said well, you always had a laugh track mind


The thing with ghost sex was, you just disappeared
Into each other
Which was pretty disappointing
But now they’re into drawn-out dream affairs
These crazy kids today
And they spend nights tucked deep inside themselves
Like portraits of a portrait of a hallway in the dark
But you can stand over here with me if you like
Wide awake and watching stars slide overhead
Watching our names get written
in all the best constellations.

maudelynn:

The Haunted Dollhouse~ 

via http://www.otterine.com

(I want this so very much) 

(via lexdysic)

enochliew:

Photographs by Thom Sheridan

In 1986, the United Way attempted to break the world record for balloon launches, by releasing 1.5 million balloons, which resulted in two deaths, millions in lawsuits, and a devastating environmental impact.

(Source: viralforest.com, via lexdysic)

selahvibe:

Many of my photographs are now incredibly mundane - pictures of black people lounging, relaxing, doing nothing but existing in real time. However, I have not lost the desire to portray a spectacle, to get lost in the stereotypes that persist in representations of black women that I also love to enact and perform, but even more, to consider style and the artifice of adornment as substance. Old habits die hard.
Today, this piece is Keïta and Sherman Had a Baby (2014). Tomorrow, the title may be any of the following:
Near Threatened
Endangered Species
Passing for a Leopard
You can’t see me, fool
Imitation of Life
Equal Opportunist
The Domestication Effect
True Beast
Dionysius, the Dying God
For My Grandma Who Passed for White, then Stopped
Living a Lie is a Poor Substitute
Jeremiah 13:23: Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots? then may ye also do good, that are accustomed to do evil.
Fuck you, I like leopard
50 Shades of Slay (Courtesy of Danielle Rennalls)

selahvibe:

Many of my photographs are now incredibly mundane - pictures of black people lounging, relaxing, doing nothing but existing in real time. However, I have not lost the desire to portray a spectacle, to get lost in the stereotypes that persist in representations of black women that I also love to enact and perform, but even more, to consider style and the artifice of adornment as substance. Old habits die hard.

Today, this piece is Keïta and Sherman Had a Baby (2014). Tomorrow, the title may be any of the following:

Near Threatened

Endangered Species

Passing for a Leopard

You can’t see me, fool

Imitation of Life

Equal Opportunist

The Domestication Effect

True Beast

Dionysius, the Dying God

For My Grandma Who Passed for White, then Stopped

Living a Lie is a Poor Substitute

Jeremiah 13:23: Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots? then may ye also do good, that are accustomed to do evil.

Fuck you, I like leopard

50 Shades of Slay (Courtesy of Danielle Rennalls)

(via ecstaticplastic)

blackgirlstalking:


In his essay The Whites of Their Eyes: Racist Ideologies and the Media, Stuart Hall posits that through the production and propagation of images, the media creates representations of our social worlds and functions as a significant means of ideological proliferation. These ideologies serve to inform us ‘how the world is and why it works as it is said and shown to work.’ Hall suggests that we construct our understanding of ourselves within these ideologies, and that they enable us to make sense of our societies and our positions within them, noting that ideologies become naturalized and ideological representations masquerade as common sense so that constructed representations are understood to be natural. Within the larger ideological struggle of representation, Hall states that said ideological imagery is resisted through social and political struggle and practice.
Visual representations of Blackness in its entirety remain a site of ideological struggle, as persistent ideologically-motivated images of Blackness construct and frame our understandings of what it means to be Black the world over. However, just as media is a site for the construction of racial ideologies, it is also one for the reconstruction, transformation and articulation of imagery that challenges these ideas. We spoke to photographer Naima Green, whose photography series Jewels from the Hinterland aims to do just that. We discussed her intentional approach to representing young Black people in her series as she explores imagery of her subjects engaging with nature, and her interest in challenging perceptions about Blackness and identity through this series.

Check out Fatima’s interview with photographer Naima Green

blackgirlstalking:

In his essay The Whites of Their Eyes: Racist Ideologies and the Media, Stuart Hall posits that through the production and propagation of images, the media creates representations of our social worlds and functions as a significant means of ideological proliferation. These ideologies serve to inform us ‘how the world is and why it works as it is said and shown to work.’ Hall suggests that we construct our understanding of ourselves within these ideologies, and that they enable us to make sense of our societies and our positions within them, noting that ideologies become naturalized and ideological representations masquerade as common sense so that constructed representations are understood to be natural. Within the larger ideological struggle of representation, Hall states that said ideological imagery is resisted through social and political struggle and practice.

Visual representations of Blackness in its entirety remain a site of ideological struggle, as persistent ideologically-motivated images of Blackness construct and frame our understandings of what it means to be Black the world over. However, just as media is a site for the construction of racial ideologies, it is also one for the reconstruction, transformation and articulation of imagery that challenges these ideas. We spoke to photographer Naima Green, whose photography series Jewels from the Hinterland aims to do just that. We discussed her intentional approach to representing young Black people in her series as she explores imagery of her subjects engaging with nature, and her interest in challenging perceptions about Blackness and identity through this series.

Check out Fatima’s interview with photographer Naima Green

(via derica)

mosoli:

but first, let me take a selkie (steals a mythical half-seal creature from scotland)

selkies are all-seal my friend, they can just change into a person. You could steal its coat?

(via milkradio)