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Park Circus, Glasgow

A mews lane, Glasgow

A mews lane, Glasgow

Landed in Glasgow amid a whirlwind of my stuff, into the mews cottage down the dark leafy lane. 

Currently I’ve only the internet of this charming Starbucks to rely on, so there won’t be many posts until Friday. 

Activities:

CW and ESL job searching.

Photo-taking

Meeting up with old friends (hopefully)

Missing Tumblr

pennyfornasa:

New Horizons Flies By Neptune Exactly 25 Years After Voyager 2 In what NASA is calling a “cosmic coincidence” the New Horizons probe makes its flyby of Neptune on the 25th anniversary of Voyager 2’s Neptune encounter. On August 25, 1989, Voyager 2 made its closest flyby of Neptune, making it the first spacecraft to study the planet. During Voyager 2’s flyby, it discovered a massive anticyclonic storm system called the Great Dark Spot, similar to Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. Today, NASA’s New Horizons probe is embarking on an equally exciting journey to another world never before visited by a spacecraft. When the spacecraft arrives on July 14, 2015, it will provide the first detailed images of Pluto. The dwarf planet is so distant from us that even images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope appear blurry. Read more about the New Horizons mission and Voyager 2’s flyby of Neptune here: http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/august/nasa-s-new-horizons-spacecraft-crosses-neptune-orbit-en-route-to-historic-pluto/index.htm

pennyfornasa:

New Horizons Flies By Neptune Exactly 25 Years After Voyager 2

In what NASA is calling a “cosmic coincidence” the New Horizons probe makes its flyby of Neptune on the 25th anniversary of Voyager 2’s Neptune encounter. On August 25, 1989, Voyager 2 made its closest flyby of Neptune, making it the first spacecraft to study the planet. During Voyager 2’s flyby, it discovered a massive anticyclonic storm system called the Great Dark Spot, similar to Jupiter’s Great Red Spot.

Today, NASA’s New Horizons probe is embarking on an equally exciting journey to another world never before visited by a spacecraft. When the spacecraft arrives on July 14, 2015, it will provide the first detailed images of Pluto. The dwarf planet is so distant from us that even images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope appear blurry.

Read more about the New Horizons mission and Voyager 2’s flyby of Neptune here: http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/august/nasa-s-new-horizons-spacecraft-crosses-neptune-orbit-en-route-to-historic-pluto/index.htm

(via knownforms)

Your ‘1:30 in the AM been driving all day on a roadtrip by myself, getting melancholy in a good way’ song. That is also a ref to Wayne’s World.

City and Colour - “Hello, I’m in Delaware”

Anonymous asked: Should Scotland be an independent country?

oh-glasgow:

Ah, now that is a better question, dear anonymous.

There are no countries that, having gained independence from their colonial masters or neighbours, ended up regretting it later on down the line. This is a chance for us to actually be a country and not, in the eyes of the EU, simply a region, that we are now.

There are many benefits to independence. Why shouldn’t we be allowed to make our own decisions? At least this time we’ll be able to get the government that we vote for. Oh, and for anyone who says “I don’t like Alex Salmond so that’s why I’m voting no.” There will be elections! You can vote for whoever you want! And there will be more chance of having independent candidates and smaller parties being represented.

I’ll be voting YES for a better future for this country, for a fairer, democratic political system, to protect the NHS (which the Westminster system are privatising piece-by-piece in England), and to get rid of nuclear weapons from our shores and not have our armed forces dragged into and killed in immoral invasions.

Some thoughts on THE WAY INN by Will Wiles

shimmer:

Will Wiles’ first novel, Care of Wooden Floors (2012),* suspended its protagonist in the tragicomic tension of occupying another man’s home, so perfectly designed to reflect the personality of its owner (a minimalist composer) that any other person trying to navigate it would be bound — like that protagonist — to chaotic misadventure. Wiles’ new novel, The Way Inn (Harper Perennial), instead takes on a space tailored to no personality, the anonymous hallways and rooms of a corporate chain hotel with locations all over the world, each meant to feel as blandly familiar and welcoming to the corporate road warrior and conference attendee as any other. As those anonymous spaces become imbued with personality, the banal revealing itself to be idiosyncratic and unpredictable, so too The Way Inn becomes a novel between or across genres: the thriller, the haunted house story, the quietly reflective contemporary novel of work.

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