Other Notebooks Are Available

Music from the passing comets. Writerly notes. Scotland - America - Australia - wonders beyond Thule.

Find out more at: Schietree

When I was a teenager, I believed the narrative around me. I believed that bisexuality was only a stepping stone to being a lesbian or just a phase or something girls said to get attention. Movies, TV shows, and brainless teen magazines as well as the gay and straight people around me diagnosed the feelings I had as being some phase. At best, I thought I was just a really progressive ally, and this would all go away. But I also feared that I was actually certifiable, because I crushed hard over girls at school, and, as my poor parents could tell you, I also obsessed over boys — the boys didn’t really like me back, but that’s another story for another publication.

If you know me, it’s no shock that I was a very social, boisterous kid. What no one knew, though, was that I actually felt incredibly isolated for the few years we lived out in the suburbs on Long Island during high school. I guess you really can’t be what you can’t see, and until I got to college, I knew no queer females of color my age in media or in real life.

There are way more examples out there these days for young women trying to figure themselves out than there were in 1997. Still, I know that some 13-year-old black girl is Googling “Can you like girls and boys?” I want her to know that she can. And it’s completely all right. She’s not crazy. She’s not the only one with a crush on her female best friend and her male lab partner. Her feelings are valid, and no one can take those feelings away from her.

My Bi Choice | Michelle Garcia for the Advocate  (via gaywrites)

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

(via knownforms)

question for british, scottish, welsh and northern irish people

doo-yah:

next week im gonna be teaching a class on what it means to be british (or any other nationality on the british isles) and it would be great if guys could tell me in one sentence what it means to be british, or scottish, welsh, english or northern irish if you identify yourself as that. plz reblog as well, need as many opinions as possible thnxxxx

So hard to do this at the moment but Britishness means holding a bloody history away at both hands while hallucinating about some kind of inherent fairness and gentility inherent in the overlying culture, which may supplement or contrast with other cultural identities within the individual.

Scottishness (I am Scottish) - to be Scottish apparently one of two options, the above (the vagueness/ahistorical Britishness) or an identity that is both old and currently scrabbling to be born. 

(via ifyourefeeling-sinister)

reminder for bisexuals

lyricalred:

today is bi visibility day. as such, bisexual people will be completely visible for the next 24 hours. this is a bad day to engage in bank heists, ghost impersonations, covert operations for vague yet menacing government agencies, and other common bisexual hobbies that rely upon our powers of invisibility. 

reblog to save a life. 

(via rodham-clinton)

3ampress replied to your post:hmmm One Story is after pieces under 8,000…

You could try Galley Beggar Singles? They published Ben Myers’ “Snorri & Frosti” and it was a bit longer than that, and then others in that group are much shorter… They’re ebooks only as far as I know…

I might give them a try, thanks!

chrisjrice:

While fishing with Grandma Conway, I found an old stony blade, pointy shaped, hard as glass, sharp as a knife, and dense as metal. Waiting on Grandma I entertained myself by striking it against the handle of the tackle box. Watched it spark when dashed against the metal edge. Saw its uses and thought to take it home with me. But Grandma put a stop to that. Took out her notepad and wrote this warning: What you carry out in your pocket is never yours to own. It belongs to the forest, to The Little People. First you must say, Little People I would like to take this. You must ask, if only in your heart. If they do not give permission, do not take as your own what you think you have found, or they will put a hex on you. Though I had yet to discover a familiar and guiding spirit, whenever I spent time in nature with Grandma Conway, I believed in them. In the woods the light deceives, dead trees crack underfoot, the wind disturbs the surface of the trail, and later you realize what you thought you saw was only what you dreamed.

chrisjrice:

While fishing with Grandma Conway, I found an old stony blade, pointy shaped, hard as glass, sharp as a knife, and dense as metal. Waiting on Grandma I entertained myself by striking it against the handle of the tackle box. Watched it spark when dashed against the metal edge. Saw its uses and thought to take it home with me. But Grandma put a stop to that. Took out her notepad and wrote this warning: What you carry out in your pocket is never yours to own. It belongs to the forest, to The Little People. First you must say, Little People I would like to take this. You must ask, if only in your heart. If they do not give permission, do not take as your own what you think you have found, or they will put a hex on you. Though I had yet to discover a familiar and guiding spirit, whenever I spent time in nature with Grandma Conway, I believed in them. In the woods the light deceives, dead trees crack underfoot, the wind disturbs the surface of the trail, and later you realize what you thought you saw was only what you dreamed.

melvillehouse:

I recognize that with Scott Walker last week, you may start thinking we only listen to lonely angel-voiced weirdos here at Melville House, but I assure you, we listen to weirdos of all stripes and talents.

always room for Harry Nilsson

hmmm

One Story is after pieces under 8,000 words.

12,700 is a tricky length it seems

annotations replied to your post:annotations replied to your post:finished the…

yeah, i know exactly what you mean. language-wise, some of my stories have been a little more straightforward recently, so they seem maybe more “genre-y.” One Story is into longer stuff, aren’t they? What about Wyvern Lit?

Wyvern Lit are going to be publishing a flash fiction of mine soon!

I will try One Story. Great idea. I’ve never written anything the right length for them before.

annotations replied to your post:finished the witchy novella! Any ideas where I…

Definitely Caketrain! Seattle Review I should look into. What about genre mags? I have some new stuff that I think might be better suited for, say F&SF magazine…

Oh, thanks! I’m never sure if I should submit to genre places. My writing, though definitely not realist, is heavy into language and all wee sentences. But I shall have a look around.